Phrasal Verbs 1/44

Here’s Chapter 6 of How We Really Talk: Using Phrasal Verbs in English

Chapter 6

“Across” is like a bridge.

GW Bridge
GW Bridge

We cross something so we can get to the other side. Information moves across space from one person to another. If I can make you understand my idea, I can “get it across” to you.

Come across  When something crosses our path, we “come across it,” or “stumble across/upon” it. “I came across a great little restaurant yesterday; you should try it!”

Come across as  To “come across as,” followed by an adjective or noun, means to give a (usually false) first impression. “He comes across as ignorant, but he actually knows a lot.”

Cut across When we are walking or driving and go a short way (on or off a road), we can “cut across” a field or wood. “If you want to get to old Mrs. Stone’s house, just cut across the field over there and you’ll be there in five minutes.

 

Exercises:

Match the phrasal verb to its definition.

1) cut across _____                                                                   a) find something by accident

2) get * across _____                                                                b) give an impression

3) stumble across or come across * _____                          c) take a short cut

4) come across as * _____                                                      d) make a message clear

Rewrite the sentences using appropriate phrasal verbs. Remember to change the verb forms (for example, adding –s or changing the tense) if necessary.

1) I __________________________a great little restaurant by accident last week.

2) The new guy _____________________________serious, but he’s really funny and nice after you get to know him.

3) Sometimes it’s hard for our math teacher to __________his message______________.

4) The road is blocked, but we can _____________________ this field.

III. Add other “across” phrasal verbs you may hear.

 

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3 thoughts on “Phrasal Verbs 1/44

  1. Glad to see you sharing more of these things. You might consider offering a little less in future posts, with a reminder that even more information is found in the book 🙂

    Like

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